Musings of an organic neural network…

SDLC

SDLC VIII : Alpha release

This is part 8 of a 13 part series.

Alpha release of a product is always an unstable version of product. It is still considered as a release because for the first time all the components are glued together and made operational. The failures at this level are expected and plans are made in advance to fix such issues. Primary goal of this exercise is to isolate the unexpected and fix it with a higher priority. The degree of failure during the alpha phase is a good indicator of over confidence of the development team.

Once out of the education system the students enter the professional world like these “alpha versions”. Having suffered suppression for their lives, they are more than eager to let their alpha instincts to drive their decision making systems. As expected their lack of knowledge feeds their delusional ego and helps in weakening their decision making abilities even further. The lack of humility and ability to reason are enough to ruin any career, a lesson taught as part of literature in curriculums and hence forgotten easily.

The grading system not only fails to classify students, it also helps boosting hollow egos of those who tend to be ranked higher on the measurement scale. This short sighted measurement technique is resulting in massive loss of time and hence money for the industry. The lack of humility is resulting in slow or no learning in industry resulting in a generation of thinkers trying to sell stale ideas for years. With laws not allowing the removal of such people from industry they are forced to have subordinates compensate for their superior’s lack of skills. But the subordinates come from the same system and are equally helpless in terms of innovation, resulting in industry expecting them to accomplish superhuman feats. This is precisely the -1 to +1 jump explained in part 3 of series. (Normal Perspective).

It is designed and ingrained in the system right from the beginning, can be statistically proven and is observed daily by millions, yet chosen to be accepted since it is favored by “majority”. Again the how majority ruins the society is elaborated in the second chapter. A simple act of humility at home and school can inspire millions of children to take a moment and think before they act. A few extra minutes per day spent to have a sensible conversation with kids can get them used to reasoning at an early age. Setting humble goals and letting their ambition take over later, could help keeping egos of majority in check.

High time, “average” should be redefined as something respectable and worth accomplishing before aspiring for excellence. Being ordinary is a perquisite for being extra ordinary, a fact often forgotten. In a blind race to excel professionally, the value systems are getting compromised at the personal level, an irreparable damage in most cases, and these fractured values setup the foundation for next generation. That is the legacy left by a generation of alpha driven greedy humans nurtured by a system created by their ancestors to breed a supposedly better specimen of the species.

Click here to read part ix : Beta Release.

SDLC Series iterator : I : Preface , II : Introduction , III: Normal Perspective , IV: Requirements Gathering , V: Functional Specifications , VI : Development , VII : Testing , VIII : Alpha Release , IX : Beta Release , X : UAT , XI : Migration , XII : Release Notes , XIII : EOF , Book Shelf: Bibliography

Human by default, Engineer by Education and Programmer by Choice. This blog is digital diary for all the technical information parsed while solving problems at work. Targeted purely as a collection of the basics that are independent of employment status and designations, but some how are most crucial in defining career and inspiring growth. If anything unique is found here then it is definitely by accident !!

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